Wildebeest Migration Overview

Masai Mara Wildebeest Migration

The Great Wildebeest Migration is one of the “Seven New Wonders of the World”.

Nowhere in the world is there a movement of animals as immense as the wildebeest migration; over two million animals migrate from the Serengeti National Park in Tanzania to the greener pastures of the Masai Mara National Reserve were they will be hunted, stalked, and run down by the larger carnivores.

 MARCH TO MAY

The herds spread out as the rains fall, then can be seen massing with their young. By April they are shifting slowly north into the central Serengeti. May finds them moving in columns into the Western Corridor whose grasslands are maintained by the flood waters of the Mbalageti and Grumeti Rivers.

JULY TO AUGUST
The cool, dry months. The herds mass on the western wooded grasslands. The famous rut usually occurs in the Seronera area, then crossing the Grumeti, two flanks can appear rapidly moving west and out of the park, with the other flank heading north towards Lobo, reaching the Mara usually by Aug. The migration has to cross the Mara River in the Masai Mara where crocodiles will prey on them. This is one of the highlights as the animals try and cross the Mara River alive risking the flood waters and the jaws of crocodiles.

SEPTEMBER TO OCTOBER

The nomadic herds are found on the well watered expanse of open and bushed grasslands of the Mara as these are usually the driest months in the Serengeti. The short rains are not far away.

NOVEMBER TO FEBRUARY

The herds head south feeling the rains coming, moving into the eastern woodlands of the Serengeti and Ngorongoro Conservation area. By Jan they settle on the short grass plains of the southern Serengeti, Dec to Jan being the peak for the birth of zebra foals and late Jan to Feb of wildebeest calves. The predators are close by. Calves are usually on their feet within 3 minutes but the young are very vulnerable.

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